backyardnature.com is   backyard nature,  backyard wildlife,   and green business for consumers
backyard lawn and garden plants including mushrooms in forestry and urban natural areas
Homepage

HOME & GARDEN
Animals: Pets & Wildlife
Home Improvement
Natural Housing
Gardening
Lawncare
Conservation Tips

Green & Sustainable
Urban Agriculture & Farming
Organic Food
Energy Efficiency
Transportation
Community
Nature Tips
Health
TRAVEL to SoCal
Eco & Nature Travel
California Nature
California Beach Communities
Hiking & Camping
Events Calendar
California Green Solutions
KIDS EYE VIEW
Squirrels
Birds
Bird Profiles
Buddy's Diner
Insects & Weird Critters
Plants & Green Stuff
Other Fun Stuff
Nature Education Center
Naturalists
INSPIRATION ETC.
Scrapbook
California Scrapbook
Japan Scrapbook
Naturalists & Heroes
Backyard Blessings
Nature Education
Nature Art & Illustration
Nature Films & Video



"Every child should have mud pies, grasshoppers, waterbugs, tadpoles, frogs & turtles, elderberries, wild strawberries, acorns, hickory nuts, trees to climb, animals to pet, hayfields, pine cones, rocks to roll, sand, snakes, huckleberries and hornets – and any child who has been deprived of these has been deprived of the best part of his education." -Luther Burbank 1849 - 1926
ABOUT US
Published by
Solutions For Green We also publish California Green Solutions and a series of blogs about healthy living solutions.

PRIVACY POLICY
We don't share your information with anyone else. We ask that parents subscribe to the newsletter. We respect our community's children. We believe we are part of "our village" and need to care for one another.

california native plants are poppies for wildflowers and native plant ecosystem

For more sustainable business information, visit CaliforniaGreenSolutions.com for Sustainable Workplace and Green Products, www.SunshineByDesign.com and ~ Movie Industry Marketing for Indie Filmmaking Tips Arkansas Pet Services ~ BLTNetwork.com for Lifestyles ~ Home and Garden Habitat, Organics and Sustainability
organic foods, organic landscaping, organic farming and organic products for babies, kids and adults.

Small business can help solve the climate change challenge

Every single small business in the nation can profit by making its own workplace more energy-efficient. According to the EPA's Energy Star Small Business program, small firms can save between 20% and 30% on their energy bills through off-the-shelf cost-effective efficiency upgrades. The job consists largely of installing the same few simple devices—programmable thermostats, for example—over and over again in millions of small business workplaces.

If scientists are right about a warming world, all of us, big businesses, small businesses, and consumers alike, are going to have to adjust. The small business community would do well to take up the challenge now, while there is time to deliberate and to craft cost-effective responses it can live with.

There's been virtually no research on what global warming means for small business, even though 23 million U.S. small businesses constitute one-half of the economy. We need to know more.

Extreme weather events, for example, can wipe out an entire region's small businesses in one fell swoop. And they can't readily bounce back from disruptions caused by natural disasters.

Reducing energy waste in U.S. homes, shops, offices, and other buildings will rely on thousands of small concerns in every state that design, make, sell, install, and service energy-efficient appliances, lighting products, heating, air-conditioning, and other equipment.

Inventing and installing technological fixes to curb greenhouse gas emissions must rely on small business innovators and entrepreneurs to produce "clean-tech" breakthroughs in photovoltaics, distributed energy, fiber-optic sensors, and the like.

California's recent reports on how to cope with climate change emphasizes the need for innovation -- and small business is the hotbed of innovation. Large corporations are better at dispersing it -- but innovation is facing a need and solving it. Kitchen sink, garage, or small lab -- individual creativity and persistence will make the difference in our society's struggle to change our way of living and working to be more in line with what our natural systems can tolerate.

We've overstepped our natural resources capacity to support local communities. Change is coming. Let's welcome it with creative determination and a shared sense of hope and self-discipline.